The platform of tomorrow is the Web

hp-chromebook-11-thumb

While some still argue if Chromebook is a legitimate laptop, Auberge Resorts (the chain of seven luxury hotels) is migrating to Chromebooks running Google’s cloud-based services, — reports Computerworld. It is a bold move, considering that the Chrome OS-based laptops accounted for just 1% of the world PC market in 2013. The main reason? The price: Chromebook can be bought for as little as $200 — a great deal for those who are mostly the MS Office’s users. And Microsoft is going to offer its free Office online apps — Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote — to Google’s Chrome Web Store.

Companies to watch: DNAnexus

DNAnexus

This is an excerpt from the job ad at DNAnexus:

At DNAnexus we are solving the most challenging computer science problems you’re ever likely to see. 
In the last few years, there has been a dramatic development in the world of genomics that has created a huge new opportunity. The price to sequence the full human genome (all of your DNA, not just a sample of it) has fallen to the point were it will soon be affordable for a patient to have multiple samples of their whole genome sequenced to help treat their disease. Want to know what specific gene mutation caused a patient’s cancer? We are building the platform to answer that kind of question. One of the many challenges is the huge amount of data. Think you’ve seen big-data problems? Think again – with each genome comprising 100 GB and months of CPU time to crunch the information, DNA is the next big-data problem, requiring exabytes of storage and parallel workloads distributed across 100,000 servers. We are tackling this by combining web technologies, big-data analytics, and scalable systems on cloud computing infrastructure. 

We are a well-funded start-up backed by Google Ventures, TPG Biotech, and First Round capital. Our founders, Andreas Sundquist, Arend Sidow, Serafim Batzoglou are world-renowned genomics and bioinformatics experts from Stanford University.

We are looking for smart motivated people. Ideal candidates will likely know several of the following technologies: C, C++, Boost, Ruby, Rails, HAML, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, ECMAScript, V8, jQuery, Flash, Flex/ActionScript, Node.js, Python, Perl, PHP, Amazon Web Services (AWS), SQL, MySQL, PostgreSQL, MongoDB, Solr, Sphinx, Hadoop, MapReduce, ZooKeeper, Hive, Pig, Oozie, HDFS, ZFS, MCache. 

And some more about the company from the company’s website:

No proposal is considered too large, as demonstrated through the CHARGE project, a collaboration between Baylor College of Medicine’s Human Genome Sequencing Center (HGSC), DNAnexus, and Amazon Web Services that enabled the largest genomic analysis project to have ever taken place in the cloud. We worked with HGSC to deploy its Mercury variant-calling pipeline on the DNAnexus cloud platform, processing 3,751 whole genomes and 10,940 exomes using 3.3 million core-hours with a peak of 20,800 cores and making Mercury available to 300 researchers participating in the global CHARGE consortium.

Here is the service model and pricing DNAnexus provides, effective May 2014:

DNAnexus_pricing_MAy_2014

 

National Cancer Institute is to create a Cancer Genomics Cloud

Government Health IT reports on the NIH’s National Cancer Institute announcement to set up the cloud infrastructure toward the establishment of a full Cancer Knowledge Commons to enable “democratic access to NCI-generated genomic data”

“Today, researchers often have to mine genomics data from various sources by locating and downloading it — such as the Cancer Genome Atlas, the Cancer Genomics Hub and the International Cancer Genome Consortium — then add their own data and use it all on local hardware.

“This model has been successful for many years,” NCI officials wrote, “but is becoming untenable given the enormous growth of biomedical data since the advent of large-scale scientific programs such as the Cancer Genome Atlas,” which on its own this year is set to generate some 2.5 petabytes, half a petabyte less than the Library of Congress’ digital collection.”

This year, $20M will be spend on awarding contractors to deliver a cloud pilot.

Data Centers (Cloud) market to grow to $200 Billion by 2020

The estimate of $200 Billion for the global cloud market is provided by IBM. Although it might be an underestimate as, in 2012, the European Cloud Computing Strategy outlined actions to deliver a net gain of 2.5 million new European jobs and an annual boost of €160 Billion by 2020, which is more than USA$200 Billion (at today’s exchange rate) for Europe alone, not counting for the US and Asian markets.