Human Longevity, Inc. plans to overrun BGI

It is already three months as Human Longevity, Inc. was officially announced. The company now has a beautifully designed website and announcements about new executive hires.  The caliber of executives points at the company plans to grow huge and grow fast; thus CIO comes from AstraZeneca, where he was the Vice President, R&D IT responsible for the global IT organization services, analytics and infrastructure supporting drug discovery and development, leading a global team of approximately 300 and was accountable for the more than $120 million R&D IT budget. The company is also building a computing and informatics program and facility in Singapore.

BioIT World was one of the first to write about the company’s launch (for more news check the company’s website):

In a move that would be shocking from almost anyone else, Venter declared that his brand-new company’s sheer sequencing power will be leapfrogging the world’s best-established genomic research centers, such as the Broad Institute.

The company has acquired 20 the latest Illumina’s HiSeq X Ten machines ($1 million a piece), which would allow for sequencing full genomes of 40,000 people a year. For comparison, BGI by the end of 2013 had already sequenced 57,000 individuals. HLI doesn’t even need to compare itself with BGI as it plans to rapidly scale to 100,000 human genomes a year (considering that Illumina is among investors).

Human Longevity will also be characterizing at least some participants’ microbiomes, and, in partnership with Metabolon of North Carolina, their metabolomes, or the constantly changing array of small molecules present in the body. On top of that, said Venter, “we will be importing clinical records of every individual we’re sequencing,” in order to bring on board crucial phenotypic data.

The goal is to integrate this mass of data for new discoveries that can wed individuals’ own genetic variants, the composition of their bacteria, the molecules in their blood, and most importantly, their medical histories. Venter stressed that his aim is to enable predictive and preventative medicine for healthy aging, discovering early warning signs for susceptibility to chronic illnesses like cancer, Alzheimer’s, and heart disease, as well as new interventions tailored to each individual’s distinct profile. “We think this will have a huge impact on changing the cost of medicine,” added Venter.

A longer-term goal is to translate some of this information into stem cell therapies, an application that ties Human Longevity to Venter’s existing company, Synthetic Genomics.

But the goal of this year is sequencing genomes of cancer patients in collaboration with the UCSD Moores Cancer Center.

What exactly the company is going to do with all these data? Do research and publish papers? Yes, and some of principal scientists hired by the company got appointments at Craig Venter Institute. Sell data and the results of analysis? Yes. “Venter and his colleagues also held out the possibility of other commercial products and properties emerging from the company’s basic research.” The company is also actively hiring, and not only computational professionals but clinical and wet lab scientists as well. Here are some more about the company mission from job ads:

HLI will develop the most comprehensive gene-phenotype database in the world, with phenotype information deriving from molecular, physiologic, clinical, microbiome and longitudinal data assays. This database will be mined for biological meaningful patterns that can lead to better diagnostics, therapeutic targets and next-generation cell-replacement therapies.